Sunday, 1 March 2015

French Indian Wars: Ambush in the Forest

In the second instalment in the Songs of Drums and Tomahawks games the British major of the garrison, upon hearing of the massacre at Johnson's Farm, has dispatched a patrol of British Regulars into the valley to find and punish those responsible for the attack. Sargent Skinner is leading the patrol, a man with a reputation for really hating the French. Unfortunately for the British an Iroquois turncoat has informed the French of Sargent Skinners movements. The French Commander, Lieutenant Philippe de Champion, has decided to lead a force of his militiamen to ambush the British as they march through the woods.

In this ambush the French has slightly less points that the English, but they set up using hidden deployment and the British can not retreat into cover if they are shot at  so long as there is Frenchmen hiding in the trees. If the results of an attack compels them to move towards cover they musty instead go prone. Once one flank is secure then the normal rules take over and the British can fall back into cover as normal. 

Skinners Patrol through the forest
French Force
Lt de Champion Q 3+ C 3 Musket, Leadership
11 Canadian Militia Q 4+ C 2 Musket

British Force
Sergeant Skinner Q 3+ C 3 Strong, Primitive Weapon, Leadership
10 Line Infantry Q 4+ C 2 Musket
2 Light Infantry Q 4+ C 2 Musket, Elan

A light infantryman spots the ambush- a bit too late for him, as he is shot and killed!
The ambush was sprung when the British light infantrymen moving ahead of Skinners column came under attack. One of the lights was killed outright, and another musket-ball came perilously close to Skinner. The sergeant, who was jolly annoyed, charged into the trees to take the fight to his French foes. Armed only with his pole-arm, he set too, killing a Frenchie with a powerful blow. The Redcoat infantrymen formed into two lines, facing each flank,  and fired their muskets into the forest. It was difficult for them to see their foes, but even so a few Frenchmen were wounded by the attack. 

Skinner goes 'barbarian' and charges into the woods after the French he so despises.
Sargent Skinner and the remaining light infantryman dashed through the woods and eventually killed or captured the remaining French militiamen on the one flank, while his men poured relentless musket fire at their foes on the oppose side of the road. The militiamen were forced back by the English firing, although they managed to wound two more redcoats. 

The Redcoats form two lines and fire into the trees

The final blow for the French came when a lucky shot from an English musket wounded Lieutenant de Champion, and the remaining militiamen dispersed back into the forests, carrying their stricken officer with them. The English were not about to charge into the forest after them, so they collect their dead and wounded and head back to the garrison. The French had lost six men, compared to the English, who had three casualties. 

Lt. de Champion (in the white) is shot and wounded, ending the ambush. 
Despite the difference in points it was felt that the game was balanced. The fact the French had split their troops up made maintaining command and control was difficultly, while the English benefited form Skinners leadership throughout the battle. Skinners skill in close combat proved quite effective as well. He has the trait "Strong", and a Combat statistic of 3. The combination of the two make him a serious threat in combat. 











5 comments:

Bob Kinnear said...

I really like how small these games are, in terms of number of figures. The table looks fantastic.

pulpcitizen said...

Looks like another fun game. :)

Simon Quinton said...

Nice report! I take it with leadership they can activate better?

Rob Bresnen said...

Thanks guys.

Simon_ Leadership adds to the models quality and that improves their activation chances. If you fail your activation role your turn is over and your opposed gets to go. It can be very tactical hoe you position your leader and what order you choose to activate your models in.

Spiderweb of History said...

I must pick up these rules! Also the figures look amazing!